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An edited version of Simon Singh’s article on chiropractic

In solidarity with a number of other blogs in support of Sense about Science’s Keep Libel Laws Out of Science campaign, I am reposting Simon Singh’s article, with a number of edits made to the sections that are the subject of the current court proceedings (i.e. the ones that the BCA have objected to), so as to avoid being in contempt. The tone and the overall meaning of the article is still unchanged – it is still highly critical of chiropractic and asks probing questions of its evidence base.

Please read the article, and then click the button below to find out more about the campaign and add your name to the list of signatories in support of the campaign statement.

Keep Libel Laws Out of Science

Keep Libel Laws Out of Science

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Bogus. Totally.

Mr. Justice Eady’s ruling in the preliminary hearing in the Simon Singh vs. British Chiropractic Association case (concerning an allegedly libellous article published in the Guardian, since removed from the Guardian website) has already received widespread blog coverage. Martin at LayScience covered the background as the hearing was about to begin. A while ago, when the British Chiropractic Association announced their intention to sue, HolfordWatch provided further background to the case. Gimpy has reposted the original offending article, annotated with evidence for Singh’s comments. Ben Goldacre has been making noises about throwing his hat into the ring (most likely not in the Guardian though). The Economist and New Scientist both provide coverage in the mainstream media.

The most complete and compelling coverage comes from JackofKent, who has been following proceedings from a very well-written legal perspective. In fact, his blog, for the time being at least, is completely dominated by this one case. It makes for fascinating (but highly disturbing) reading. In fact, before you read any more of this post, visit http://jackofkent.blogspot.com/ and familiarise yourself with the case. Hats off to the chap. In fact, this post is taking far longer to write than it should because I’m getting sucked into reading and re-reading his articles.

I’m bringing this up after noting something interesting about the Times article by David Aaronovitch I commented on in my previous post. Something completely unrelated to my previous post, but relevant to the context of the Singh case.

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